16 thoughts on “Gooooooooo Tooooooooo Bed!

  1. Matty

    I like the second-to-last (or “penultimate”) sentence of the article:

    “A few scientists theorize that sleep problems during formative years can cause permanent changes in a child’s brain structure: damage that one can’t sleep off like a hangover.”

    Frankly, if your 8-year old has to sleep of his hangovers, you’ve got bigger issues than sleep deprivation.

  2. Jonathan

    As an average music major in college I average about 4.5 hours a night between practicing and theory and practical musicianship and other stuff. I feel it but I feel like there is nothing else I can do. I can’t just stop doing any of those things though. Then the nights I am lucky enough to get a gig I have to put off the other stuff ’till I’m done then do it. It is a vicious cycle that I don’t even think graduating will solve. You can tell by the time stamp on this post that it is gonna be another late night.

  3. Matty

    Well, gee, Jonathan…

    Maybe if you’d spend more time doing your theory work and less time reading mindless crap about Volkswagen Jettas and infant cannibalism, you could get a little sleep.

    Recovering Music Major,
    Matty

  4. June Post author

    Jonathan, just reading the words “in college I average about 4.5 hours a night” makes my stomach start to churn into the knots I lived with for all four years of my college career.

    I don’t know what the answer is…maybe, take five years to graduate?

    By the way, what is “practical musicianship?” (I mean, what is it besides funny?)

  5. Jonathan

    Well I probably should spend more time doing my homework early, speaking of which I just finished it and it is not due till thursday. June, I am taking five years at least (I am double majoring in commercial music business and music education, but it is going to take at least 5 years. I did start a simester behind because of getting things switched but still). Practical Musicianship is a class all music majors have to take that involves sight singing. The do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do stuff. It’s goal is to relate all music to something all of us have, voice. It also helps in ear training. Unfortunately it doesn’t help as much as it should but I have noticed it helping, it still it a bit much. We are expected to practice about 15 hours a week just for that class.

  6. michael lee

    [quote comment="133542"]The do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do stuff. It’s goal is to relate all music to something all of us have, voice. It also helps in ear training. Unfortunately it doesn’t help as much as it should but I have noticed it helping, it still it a bit much.[/quote]

    It’s goal is also to break the bad habit of constantly relating all music ideas back to either how they look in ink, or how they function on your home instrument. It’s trying to regain for you the idea of scales as a sets of tension and resolution, and to think about notes as functions within that set, instead of as this line on this staff, or this fingering on this instrument.

    I think it might be one of the best things we’ve added to the curriculum sing the Road House crew left the building.

  7. June Post author

    Ah, I see. I took a visual arts class that was the equivalent (can’t remember what it was called). Basically, it taught us to SEE.

    Sleep when ya can.

  8. June Post author

    Ok, the double “see” in that comment is kind of odd. In college I double majored in art and writing until the 11th hour, at which time I opted for not taking the final writing class or two I needed to have an official writing major (in order that I might sleep any amount at all). It shows I guess. (My lack of writing skills I mean.)

  9. Jonathan

    [quote comment="133573"]
    Its goal is also to break the bad habit of constantly relating all music ideas back to either how they look in ink, or how they function on your home instrument. It’s trying to regain for you the idea of scales as a sets of tension and resolution, and to think about notes as functions within that set, instead of as this line on this staff, or this fingering on this instrument.

    I think it might be one of the best things we’ve added to the curriculum sing the Road House crew left the building.[/quote]

    That is what I was trying to say. In that class they don’t teach us the vocabulary to explain the class. It is a great class and something we should all take. I think what makes it so hard is that we are all at different levels, and I mean WAY different. Some of us play sax and read music quite well and others sing and barely read music at all. It makes the group learning very difficult. But on those few days that things go well, I end up learning a lot.

  10. Sharolyn

    [quote comment="133577"]Ah, I see. I took a visual arts class that was the equivalent (can’t remember what it was called). Basically, it taught us to SEE. [/quote]

    June, I am curious what the equivalents are in art. I’ve haven’t thought about that very much.

    And if I am to stay on the post’s topic (is that blog ettiquette?), every once in a while I go to bed before 10 (despite temptations) and in the morning I feel GREAT. Try it. It is a gift to yourself.

  11. Sharolyn

    Sadly, 99% of what I know about Kodaly I learned after APU, and I was a Music Ed. major. I’m now a public school music teacher, so it’s kind of important to know. I’m glad to hear that things have changed.

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